Google Security Blog

Improved malware protection for users in the Advanced Protection Program

Google Security Blog - Wed, 09/16/2020 - 1:00pm
Posted by Daniel Rubery, Software Engineer, Chrome, Ryan Rasti, Software Engineer, Safe Browsing, and Eric Mill, Product Manager, Chrome Security

Google’s Advanced Protection Program helps secure people at higher risk of targeted online attacks, like journalists, political organizations, and activists, with a set of constantly evolving safeguards that reflect today’s threat landscape. Chrome is always exploring new options to help all of our users better protect themselves against common online threats like malware. As a first step, today Chrome is expanding its download scanning options for users of Advanced Protection.


Advanced Protection users are already well-protected from phishing. As a result, we’ve seen that attackers target these users through other means, such as leading them to download malware. In August 2019, Chrome began warning Advanced Protection users when a downloaded file may be malicious.


Now, in addition to this warning, Chrome is giving Advanced Protection users the ability to send risky files to be scanned by Google Safe Browsing’s full suite of malware detection technology before opening the file. We expect these cloud-hosted scans to significantly improve our ability to detect when these files are malicious. 

  

When a user downloads a file, Safe Browsing will perform a quick check using metadata, such as hashes of the file, to evaluate whether it appears potentially suspicious. For any downloads that Safe Browsing deems risky, but not clearly unsafe, the user will be presented with a warning and the ability to send the file to be scanned. If the user chooses to send the file, Chrome will upload it to Google Safe Browsing, which will scan it using its static and dynamic analysis techniques in real time. After a short wait, if Safe Browsing determines the file is unsafe, Chrome will warn the user. As always, users can bypass the warning and open the file without scanning, if they are confident the file is safe. Safe Browsing deletes uploaded files a short time after scanning.



Online threats are constantly changing, and it's important that users’ security protections automatically evolve as well. With the US election fast approaching, for example, Advanced Protection could be useful to members of political campaigns whose accounts are now more likely to be targeted. If you’re a user at high-risk of attack, visit g.co/advancedprotection to enroll in the Advanced Protection Program.
Categories: Google Security Blog

Announcing new reward amounts for abuse risk researchers

Google Security Blog - Tue, 09/01/2020 - 1:28pm
Posted by Marc Henson, Lead and Program Manager, Trust & Safety; Anna Hupa, Senior Strategist, at GoogleIt has been two years since we officially expanded the scope of Google’s Vulnerability Reward Program (VRP) to include the identification of product abuse risks.

Thanks to your work, we have identified more than 750 previously unknown product abuse risks, preventing abuse in Google products and protecting our users. Collaboration to address abuse is important, and we are committed to supporting research on this growing challenge. To take it one step further, and as of today, we are announcing increased reward amounts for reports focusing on potential attacks in the product abuse space.

The nature of product abuse is constantly changing. Why? The technology (product and protection) is changing, the actors are changing, and the field is growing. Within this dynamic environment, we are particularly interested in research that protects users' privacy, ensures the integrity of our technologies, as well as prevents financial fraud or other harms at scale.

Research in the product abuse space helps us deliver trusted and safe experiences to our users. Martin Vigo's research on Google Meet's dial-in feature is one great example of an 31337 report that allowed us to better protect users against bad actors. His research provided insight on how an attacker could attempt to find Meet Phone Numbers/Pin, which enabled us to launch further protections to ensure that Meet would provide a secure technology connecting us while we're apart.

New Reward Amounts for Abuse Risks

What’s new? Based on the great submissions that we received in the past as well as feedback from our Bug Hunters, we increased the highest reward by 166% from $5,000 to $13,337. Research with medium to high impact and probability will now be eligible for payment up to $5,000.

What did not change? Identification of new product abuse risks remains the primary goal of the program. Reports that qualify for a reward are those that will result in changes to the product code, as opposed to removal of individual pieces of abusive content. The final reward amount for a given abuse risk report also remains  at the discretion of the reward panel. When evaluating the impact of an abuse risk, the panels look at both the severity of the issue as well as the number of impacted users.

What's next? We plan to expand the scope of Vulnerability Research Grants to support research preventing abuse risks. Stay tuned for more information!

Starting today the new rewards take effect. Any reports that were submitted before September 1, 2020 will be rewarded based on the previous rewards table.

We look forward to working closely together with the researcher community to prevent abuse of Google products and ensure user safety.

Happy bug hunting!
Categories: Google Security Blog

Vulnerability Reward Program: 2019 Year in Review

Google Security Blog - Tue, 08/25/2020 - 12:42am
Posted by Natasha Pabrai, Jan Keller, Jessica Lin, Anna Hupa, and Adam Bacchus, Vulnerability Reward Programs at Google

Our Vulnerability Reward Programs were created to reward researchers for protecting users by telling us about the security bugs they find. Their discoveries help keep our users, and the internet at large, safe. We look forward to even more collaboration in 2020 and beyond.

2019 has been another record-breaking year for us, thanks to our researchers! We paid out over $6.5 million in rewards, doubling what we’ve ever paid in a single year. At the same time our researchers decided to donate an all-time-high of $500,000 to charity this year. That’s 5x the amount we have ever previously donated in a single year. Thanks so much for your hard work and generous giving!
Since 2010, we have expanded our VRPs to cover additional Google product areas, including Chrome, Android, and most recently Abuse. We've also expanded to cover popular third party apps on Google Play, helping identify and disclose vulnerabilities to impacted app developers. Since then we have paid out more than $21 million in rewards*. As we have done in years past, we are sharing our 2019 Year in Review across these programs.
What’s changed in the past year?

  • Chrome’s VRP increased its reward payouts by tripling the maximum baseline reward amount from $5,000 to $15,000 and doubling the maximum reward amount for high quality reports from $15,000 to $30,000. The additional bonus given to bugs found by fuzzers running under the Chrome Fuzzer Program is also doubling to $1,000. More details can be found in their program rules page.
  • Android Security Rewards expanded its program with new exploit categories and higher rewards. The top prize is now $1 million for a full chain remote code execution exploit with persistence which compromises the Titan M secure element on Pixel devices. And if you achieve that exploit on specific developer preview versions of Android, we’re adding in a 50% bonus, making the top prize $1.5 million. See our program rules page for more details around our new exploit categories and rewards.
  • Abuse VRP engaged in outreach and education to increase researchers awareness about the program, presenting an overview of our Abuse program in Australia, Malaysia, Vietnam, the UK and US.
  • The Google Play Security Reward Program expanded scope to any app with over 100 million installs, resulting in over $650,000 in rewards in the second half of 2019.
  • The Developer Data Protection Reward Program was launched in 2019 to identify and mitigate data abuse issues in Android apps, OAuth projects, and Chrome extensions.
We also had the goal of increasing engagement with our security researchers over the last year at events such as BountyCon in Singapore and ESCAL8 in London. These events not only allow us to get to know each of our bug hunters but also provide a space for bug hunters to meet one another and hopefully work together on future exploits.
A hearty thank you to everyone that contributed to the VRPs in 2019. We are looking forward to increasing engagement even more in 2020 as both Google and Chrome VRPs will turn 10. Stay tuned for celebrations. Follow us on @GoogleVRP

*The total amount was updated on January 28; it previously said we paid out more than $15 million in rewards.
Categories: Google Security Blog